SEO Salary & Job Research Study 2015

New research from Conductor offers interesting insight when it comes to the SEO salary landscape.

Charity Stebbins, Senior Content Strategist at Conductor, said some of their top findings included:

  • 18% growth in number of SEO jobs in the top 20 cities (listed in the below infographic)
  • Double digit salary growth across the board (average 17% growth. Marketing managers on the high end with 26% growth)
  • A Shift in Top Cities: New York and San Francisco stayed in the top positions, while San Jose and Seattle moved up to the top 5 for the first time. Chicago rounded out the top 5.
  • 11% growth in the Account Manager field
  • Director of Marketing positions make over $104,000 on average

Check out some of their other finds below and in their blog post about the study:

4 Reasons SEO Jobs and SEO Salaries Are Rising

SEO jobs are up nearly 20% from three years ago, and the average SEO salary has doubled. Obviously, that’s great news for the SEO industry. But why is it growing at such a steep rate? Here’s four of the main contributing factors:

  1. Content marketing is booming; SEO, naturally, grows alongside it. After all, SEO is the craft of getting that content found on organic channels. You need both for a successful content strategy.
  2. Businesses are scrambling to fill in-house SEO talent gaps. We conducted a survey of enterprise SEOs in 2014, and those respondents reported that the #1 obstacle in the way of their SEO success was a lack of in-house SEO skills. The rise we see in SEO salaries reflects that pain point.
  3. SEO jobs themselves have become more complex. You’re not just paying your SEO for his or her technical skills anymore, the SEO role has evolved. They are business leaders, strategists, and an internal evangelists. They must master more robust SEO technology and manage bigger budgets. They’re also responsible for bringing in more revenue.
  4. Relying primarily on paid media strategies is a dying art. Take, for example, the recent research around growing ad blindness on Facebook — that’s just one of many indicators that consumers are getting better at blocking out ad strategies faster. More than ever, there’s no substitute for a strong presence on organic channels.

 

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Google Adwords conversion rate averages by industry

Wordstream have published some useful research for benchmarking paid search marketing at a high level. If you’re considering paid search it gives you an idea of the conversion rates you can expect when making the business case. Of course, a test will show you rates specific to your market and your site, but this gives an indication.

The Average Click Thru Rate on AdWords Varies For Search And Display

In any given industry, the click through rate of Google’s ads in Google Search were always higher than the click through rate on the Google Display Network. However, the average Google Display Network click through rate of any industry was still significantly higher than a Facebook ad.

The Average Cost Per Click on AdWords Revealed Conversion Opportunities

In our analysis we found a lot of industry verticals where Google’s Display Network had lower average cost per click and higher average conversion rates than Google Search ads. Yes, you heard that right. There are industries where Google Display Ads are being undervalued because they are cheaper and convert better than your bread and butter search ads.

We believe this might be due to the effectiveness of Google remarketing, and the trend may even increase once dynamic remarketing becomes more widely adopted!

This infographic is based on advertisers across industries using their AdWords performance grader over one billion dollars of spend.

Here’s a summary of the main findings taken

  • Average conversion rate for the search network in Q3 2012: 5.63%
  • Average conversion rate from the display network in Q3 2012: 4.68%
  • The Travel industry has the lowest conversion rates
  • Internet / Telecoms has the highest conversion rates across search & display.
  • The display network (ads outside of Google on publisher sites useful for generating awareness) generates 5x the volume of impressions but 1/5 of the clicks compared to the search network (searches within Google and its partners). 
  • Clickthrough rates are not covered by this research, but Wordstream suggest an average 2% to 5% paid search clickthrough rate for competitive industries and a 5%+ click-through rate for non-competitive industries for top positions with brand terms higher.

(view original post).

Relaunch SEO Checklist Points

Search engine optimization adherence in the website relaunch/redesign process is a topic

We may now know what to consider during the redesign phase and how to remedy issues, but we must follow these items below to have a truly effective relaunch…at the time of pressing go. Some of these checklist items reflect technical SEO considerations for content visibility to search engines and users, items pertaining to on-page SEO, and also analytical tracking items you don’t want to overlook.

  • Redirect Mapping  – Ensure that the development team and content team are in a cohesive understanding of the intended new page naming conventions and URL structure.
  • Exclusion Migration – While your new site is transitioning from a staging site to production, you may have placed proper exclusion efforts to rid search engine crawling in the staging area such as a full staging site robots.txt disallow or Meta Robots usage within individual page source code.
  • On-Page SEO Transition – While your mind may be focused on your new design and how great the new site will look, don’t forget that optimized on-page elements need to transition into the new site, too. You must ensure that the title elements from the staging site will transition to the new site
  • Internal Linking – A redesigned site close to launch can be rife with internal linking flaws. Before the site goes live you should do manual review of important links.
  • Code Review – Review the code to ensure there are not any old CSS or JS server side referenced file requests that will not be used in the new site. You will want to make sure you retain Open Graph and Twitter Card tagging if you currently have this on the live site.
  • Look and Feel (Compatibility) – You must ensure that your new design will provide the same experience for every user based on their browser and browser version.
  • Analytical Considerations – The first consideration is tracking coverage. Ensure that every page features the same analytical tracking that the existing site has.

 

 

.htaccess snippets to optimize your website

 .htaccess snippets to optimize your website

Apache .htaccess file is at the heart of your web server and control how your website will react to different actions performed by your visitors. I’ve compiled 10+ awesome .htaccess snippets to optimize your website in many ways: Redirections, performances, ease of use… Enjoy!

All of the snippets below have to be pasted into your .htaccess file, which is located on the root of your Apache server.

Warning: Always make sure you have a working backup before editing your .htaccess file!

Force trailing slash

Many clients of mine asked me for always having a trailing slash at the end of their urls. Looks like it’s great for SEO. The following snippet will alwyas add a trailing slash to your site urls.

<IfModule mod_rewrite.c>
 RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} /+[^\.]+$
 RewriteRule ^(.+[^/])$ %{REQUEST_URI}/ [R=301,L]
</IfModule>

Source: http://perishablepress.com/code-snippets/

Prevent Hotlinking

Hotlinking (the act of using images from another site than yours) is unfortunely a common practice which can waste lots of your precious bandwidth. This useful snippets will redirect all hotlinked images to a specific image, defined on line 6.

RewriteEngine On
#Replace ?mysite\.com/ with your blog url
RewriteCond %{HTTP_REFERER} !^http://(.+\.)?mysite\.com/ [NC]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_REFERER} !^$
#Replace /images/nohotlink.jpg with your "don't hotlink" image url
RewriteRule .*\.(jpe?g|gif|bmp|png)$ /images/nohotlink.jpg [L]

Source: http://www.wprecipes.com/how-to-protect-your…

Redirect mobile devices

If your site is not using responsive web design yet, it could be very useful to be able to redirect mobile device to a mobile-specific version of your website.

RewriteEngine On
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !^/m/.*$
RewriteCond %{HTTP_ACCEPT} "text/vnd.wap.wml|application/vnd.wap.xhtml+xml" [NC,OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} "acs|alav|alca|amoi|audi|aste|avan|benq|bird|blac|blaz|brew|cell|cldc|cmd-" [NC,OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} "dang|doco|eric|hipt|inno|ipaq|java|jigs|kddi|keji|leno|lg-c|lg-d|lg-g|lge-" [NC,OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT}  "maui|maxo|midp|mits|mmef|mobi|mot-|moto|mwbp|nec-|newt|noki|opwv" [NC,OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} "palm|pana|pant|pdxg|phil|play|pluc|port|prox|qtek|qwap|sage|sams|sany" [NC,OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} "sch-|sec-|send|seri|sgh-|shar|sie-|siem|smal|smar|sony|sph-|symb|t-mo" [NC,OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} "teli|tim-|tosh|tsm-|upg1|upsi|vk-v|voda|w3cs|wap-|wapa|wapi" [NC,OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} "wapp|wapr|webc|winw|winw|xda|xda-" [NC,OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} "up.browser|up.link|windowssce|iemobile|mini|mmp" [NC,OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} "symbian|midp|wap|phone|pocket|mobile|pda|psp" [NC]
#------------- The line below excludes the iPad
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} !^.*iPad.*$
#-------------
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} !macintosh [NC] #*SEE NOTE BELOW
RewriteRule ^(.*)$ /m/ [L,R=302]

Source: http://snipplr.com/view.php?codeview&id=55114

Force download of a specific filetype

For some reasons you may need to force download of specific files, such as MP3s or XLS. This code snippets will prevent your visitor’s browser to read the file and force downloading instead.

<Files *.xls>
  ForceType application/octet-stream
  Header set Content-Disposition attachment
</Files>
<Files *.eps>
  ForceType application/octet-stream
  Header set Content-Disposition attachment
</Files>

Source: http://snipplr.com/view.php?codeview&id=54752

Cross Domain Font embedding for Firefox

When embedding a font, Firefox do not allow you to embed from an external website. Using the .htaccess snippet below, you can bypass this limitation.

<FilesMatch "\.(ttf|otf|eot|woff)$">
<IfModule mod_headers.c>
    Header set Access-Control-Allow-Origin "http://yourdomain.com"
</IfModule>
</FilesMatch>

Source: http://snipplr.com/view/53703

Speed up your site with .htaccess caching

This is probably the most useful snippet of this whole list. By using some simple .htaccess file cahing, you can dramatically increase your website speed. A snippet you should always have on your toolbox!

# 1 YEAR
<FilesMatch "\.(ico|pdf|flv)$">
Header set Cache-Control "max-age=29030400, public"
</FilesMatch>
# 1 WEEK
<FilesMatch "\.(jpg|jpeg|png|gif|swf)$">
Header set Cache-Control "max-age=604800, public"
</FilesMatch>
# 2 DAYS
<FilesMatch "\.(xml|txt|css|js)$">
Header set Cache-Control "max-age=172800, proxy-revalidate"
</FilesMatch>
# 1 MIN
<FilesMatch "\.(html|htm|php)$">
Header set Cache-Control "max-age=60, private, proxy-revalidate"
</FilesMatch>

Source: http://www.askapache.com/htaccess/speed-up-sites-with-htaccess-caching.html

Stop spam on your WordPress blog

Sick of spammers on your WordPress blog? Of course, Akismet helps a lot, but your .htaccess file can also help: Today’s recipe is a snippet that prevent spam bots to directly access your wp-comments-post.php file, which is used to post comments on your blog.

<IfModule mod_rewrite.c>
RewriteEngine On
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_METHOD} POST
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} .wp-comments-post\.php*
RewriteCond %{HTTP_REFERER} !.*yourdomainname.* [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^$
RewriteRule (.*) ^http://%{REMOTE_ADDR}/$ [R=301,L]
</IfModule>

Source: http://www.wprecipes.com/reduce-spam-on-your-wordpress-blog-by-using-htaccess

Redirect different feeds to a single format

Years ago, differents feed formats, such as RSS, Atom or Rdf were used. Nowadays, it seems that RSS is definitely the most used. This snippets allows you to redirect all feeds formats to a single feed. This snippet can be used “as it” on WordPress blogs.

<IfModule mod_alias.c>
 RedirectMatch 301 /feed/(atom|rdf|rss|rss2)/?$ http://example.com/feed/
 RedirectMatch 301 /comments/feed/(atom|rdf|rss|rss2)/?$ http://example.com/comments/feed/
</IfModule>

Source: http://www.wprecipes.com/redirect-feeds-to-a-single-format

Configure your website for HTML5 videos

HTML5 is bringing lots of new exiting options in the world of web development. Among other cool features, being able to play videos without using Flash is really cool. Though, you have to configure your server properly to work with the latest HTML5 video standards. This snippet will definitely help.

RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-d
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !=/favicon.ico
AddType video/ogg .ogv
AddType video/ogg .ogg
AddType video/mp4 .mp4
AddType video/webm .webm
AddType application/x-shockwave-flash swf

Source: http://snipplr.com/view.php?codeview&id=53437

Log PHP errors

Instead of displaying PHP errors to your site (and to possible hackers…) this code snippet will log it into a .log file while hiding errors to visitors.

# display no errs to user
php_flag display_startup_errors off
php_flag display_errors off
php_flag html_errors off
# log to file
php_flag log_errors on
php_value error_log /location/to/php_error.log

Source: http://css-tricks.com/snippets/htaccess/php-error-logging/

Run PHP inside JavaScript files

When coding in JavaScript, it can very useful to be able to use PHP inside the .js files, for example for retrieving data from your database. Here is a snippet to allow the use of PHP inside .js files.

AddType application/x-httpd-php .js
AddHandler x-httpd-php5 .js

<FilesMatch "\.(js|php)$">
SetHandler application/x-httpd-php
</FilesMatch>

Source: http://www.kavoir.com/2010/07/how-to-execute-run-php-code-inside-javascript-files.html

Shifts In Google SEO in 2012

The Present year has been a major shifts in Google especially in Search Engine Optimization for 2012 we can Call the Farmer Updates to the new implementation called Disavow Links and more..

The Major one was Panda Update which helped to fight against WebSpam. Other implementations like Penguin had a major role along with Exact Matched Domains.

Google had taken a major step against Pirate Websites on DMCA requests. i liked most is  Google’s new abilities was the announcement that its search spiders can now execute AJAX and JavaScript.

Taking the necessary against the Domain Farming/Parking has provided a lots of relief to the people in the domains industry. The recent update was about the Google News Tag which help a lots of fresh content to showcase themselves

Along with these there are other updates which happend along the past 12 months (November to November 2012) which was a greater aspect of learning for me in the Digital Marketing Industry.

Google had made major snatch for the Original Content Information to getting to the users instead of the scrapped Content sites

TIP: If you don’t measure what you’re doing in search and social media, how do you know if what you’re doing is working?

If I have missed anything for the present year updates do share them in the below mentioned comments

Multilingual SEO

Google has recently done a series on the usability of multilingual websites and it got me thinking about multilingual SEO. How do you, in fact, optimize the same website for keywords in multiple languages?

Multilingual SEO: Things to Remember

But let’s start with the core basics. In simple terms, a multilingual website is a website that has content in more than one language. And such website has a lot of on-page stuff that is often done wrong. Let’s take a look at some common issues:

1) Language recognition

Once Google’s crawler lands on your multilingual website, it starts with determining the main language on every page. Google can recognize a page as being in more than one language but you can avoid crawler confusion by doing the following:

  • Stick to only one language per page
  • Avoid side-by-side translations
  • Use the same language for all elements of the page: headers, sidebars, menus, etc.

Some web editors create code-level attributes automatically but these attributes are not very reliable, so keep in mind that Google ignores all code-level information (from “lang” attributes to DTD (Document Type Definitions) during language recognition.

2) URL structure

A typical pet peeve of SEO but even more so with multilingual websites. To make the most of your URLs, consider language-specific extensions. Language-specific extensions are often used on multilingual websites to help users (and crawlers) identify the sections of the website they are on and the language the page is in. For example:

http://www.website.ca/en/content.html

http://www.en.website.ca/content.html

http://www.website.ca/fr/content.html

http://www.fr.website.ca/content.html

This is a great way to organize URLs on a multilingual website because not only does it help the user, but it also makes it easier for the crawler to analyze the indexing of your content. But what if you want to create URLs with characters other than English? Here’s how to do it right:

  • Use UTF-8 encoding for non-English characters
  • Make sure your UTF-8 encoded URLs are properly escaped when linked from within your content

i.e. if a URL contains an é, which is a non-English character: http://www.website.ca/fr/contént.html

here’s how it will look properly escaped: http://www.website.ca/fr/cont%C3%A9nt.html

It is important to note that Google directly extracts character encodings from HTTP headers, HTML page headers, and content. There isn’t much you need to do about character encoding, other than watching out for conflicting information – for example, between content and headers. While Google can recognize different character encodings, use UTF-8 on your website whenever possible.

3) Crawling and Indexing

Another common area of focus for SEO. On multilingual websites, follow these recommendations to get more pages crawled:

  • Avoid redirects based on user’s perceived language: they could, in fact, prevent both users and SEs from looking at more pages on your site.
  • Keep the content for each language on separate URLs
  • Don’t use cookies to show translated page versions
  • Cross-link page by page

Last but not least, please remember that Google does not recommend automatic translations.

By getting the on-page basics right, you will set a great base for your multilingual SEO in the future and, unlike so many others, you will not have to beg (in multiple languages) SE crawlers to come and index your content.