Google Analytics cannot be ignored by any SEO

Google Analytics cannot be ignored by any SEO

Google Analytics cannot be ignored by any SEO or for that matter any web marketing professional. Google introduces this application which is offered for free by Google as –

Google Analytics is the enterprise-class web analytics solution that gives you rich insights into your website traffic and marketing effectiveness. Powerful, flexible and easy-to-use features now let you see and analyze your traffic data in an entirely new way. With Google Analytics, you’re more prepared to write better-targeted ads, strengthen your marketing initiatives and create higher converting websites.

FYI: The Google Analytics can be accessed here. The analytics product tour video can be viewed here.

If you register and view the data metrics offered you will see that there is a comprehensive portfolio giving you the details about how the visitor reached your web page and what content was viewed and also the client side data which can help you judge what kind of impression your site must have made on the visitor. It also allows you to download the data as an excel sheet or in a PDF format and mail it to the client or create logins so the client can view the data at its own convenient time and his own curiosity level. With Google Analytics data SEO’s can manage to calculate the ROI which can be found reliable by the client as Google enjoys a very high trust factor when it comes to search and search products.

But when you have a lot of data available it is quite possible that one can get confused and lose focus from the purpose of tracking the site. There can be many reasons for tracking the data but let us see from the SEO perspective which metrics should be monitored  daily, weekly, or monthly to keep an eye on where the site is heading to on the web.

I tend to focus on the following metrics, assuming I want to keep atrack of the visits from search engines and the especially visits from Google.

Month
Visits
New Visits
Visits From Search Engines
Visits From Google
Bounce Rate

If you maintain this data month-wise, you get an idea about the improvement or the results achieved as a result of SEO done on the site.

Another important report to be maintained is the no. of keywords with which the site is ranking and the source (you can select the source as Google and get an idea with how many and which keywords the site is ranking on Google and how many visitors are reaching your site via this source and how many pages are being viewed by them)

Read more: Google Analytics cannot be ignored by any SEO

Social media risk for big brands: some examples and a solution

According to a recent survey from eConsultancy, no less than 83% of in-house marketers said they expected their social media spending to increase over the next year.

And yet at the same time, only 41% of inhouse marketers said they have a strategic plan in place according to this report from Digital Brand Expressions.

It’s a worrying statistic, and it lays bare the struggle that big companies face when it comes to incorporating social media into their marketing and communications strategy. Companies understandably want to get involved in this burgeoning space, and reap the benefits of engaging with current, and potential, consumers through social media.

The risks attached to a poor social media plan

And yet a badly thought out (or non-existent) strategy can do far more harm than big brands realise.

According to a recent survey from eConsultancy, no less than 83% of in-house marketers said they expected their social media spending to increase over the next year.

And yet at the same time, only 41% of in house marketers said they have a strategic plan in place according to this report from Digital Brand Expressions.

It’s a worrying statistic, and it lays bare the struggle that big companies face when it comes to incorporating social media into their marketing and communications strategy. Companies understandably want to get involved in this burgeoning space, and reap the benefits of engaging with current, and potential, consumers through social media.

The risks attached to a poor social media plan

And yet a badly thought out (or non-existent) strategy can do far more harm than big brands realise.

 

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Holiday Bonus: More Great Features

We all love the holiday season, and so now, here are a few reasons to love it even more! A few weeks ago, we announced a set of powerful, flexible, and intelligent features. Today, at SES Chicago, Phil Mui announced additional features that build on these same themes to make your life as an analyst easier. We hope you’ll enjoy them.

Annotations

Do you ever wonder about an inexplicable change in your traffic? Or forget exactly when you launched something, or who was responsible? After scratching your head, did you have to chase down different departments in your company or go digging through old emails to get an answer?

For instance:

  • Was that dip in traffic because the servers went down?
  • When did the new display ads campaign launch?
  • Who’s responsible for the checkout page redesign and when did it go live?

Running around asking everyone from marketing, IT, and product doesn’t scale. More and more large companies are using Google Analytics, so we wanted to cut down on the mileage you need to cover to account for everything that happens to your website and online marketing.

This week, the wild goose chase is over — you can now easily denote unexplained dips or spikes and figure out “what happened” with the launch of Annotations in Google Analytics.


Annotations allows any user with access to a Google Analytics profile to leave shared or private notes right on the over-time graph. Building upon the concept of bringing Intelligence to data, Annotations complements existing anomaly detection by capturing the tribal intelligence of your company, which tends to be the most expensive and easily lost resource of all. A simple note from a colleague can save hours of real work (and frustration) for an analyst who is tasked to explain a usually dry set of numbers. This short video will show you how to use Annotations.

Taking its usefulness even further: Annotations can become your central repository, or logbook, for all online marketing and website design actions within your business. So even if you have multiple marketing teams, agencies, or webmasters, or if you have employee churn or other disruptions, you can always see which events may have caused conversions to increase or decrease. No wonder this has been one of the top requested features in Analytics for such a long time!

Custom Variables Now Available In Advanced Segments


Custom Variables provide you the power and flexibility to customize Google Analytics and collect the unique site usage data most important to your business. In Google Analytics, not only are you able to define multiple custom variables, each custom variable is a name-value pair and can be assigned one of 3 scopes: page, session, or visitor. Each custom variable name and each value is an arbitrary string defined by you pertinent to your business needs.

When we announced Multiple Custom Variables in October, the only way to view metrics on these Custom Variables then was to open the standard “Custom Variables” report in the Visitors section. This week, a user can create an advanced segmentation based on any key, value, as well as key-value combination of all Custom Variables. In other words, if you’ve created a Custom Variable such as “Logged In Member”, you can also create an advanced segment based on that variable and see it across all of your reports.

The ability to create visit segments based on Custom Variables is critical in maximizing the full potential of Custom Variables. Users can now slice and dice their metrics by decorating their site traffic with the appropriate key-value pairs.
Custom Variables Available In Custom Reports
You can also create Custom Reports with any of the key or value dimensions associated with any Custom Variable. Now, you can see how a segment defined by Custom Variables behaves along any of the metrics available in Google Analytics.

New Analytics Tracking Code Setup Wizard

One of the more daunting tasks in setting up analytics on any site is to manually configure the tracking code for specialized situations, such as multiple subdomains, cross-domain tracking, mobile web tracking, PHP sites, campaign tagging, etc.

Well, fear no more. When you create a profile, you’ll notice a new tracking code setup wizard in Google Analytics. This wizard automatically generates the appropriate tracking code according to the setup options specified by you.

New Version of The Analytics API

Later this week, there will be a separate announcement about a set of very exciting features to our Analytics API. Here’s a little preview: Support for Advanced Segmentation will now be available through the API.

In addition, new data dimensions and metrics will be made available, including those in our recently announced features.

Advanced Filtering in Google Analytics

Advanced Filtering in Google Analytics simplifies narrowing down data in the reports table by allowing threshold filters to be created. Instead of creating standard profile filters or weeding through rows and rows of data, Advanced Filters can be created on the fly for any report.

Here is another in-depth look at one of our recently announced new features: Advanced Filters (or Advanced Table Filters), written by the excellent team at LunaMetrics, a Google Analytics Authorized Consultant.

For the daily user, Advanced Filters may be the most useful new feature of the bundle of new features, in terms of streamlining your actual process once you access a report and are actively doing analysis. They are found at the bottom of the table in any report. As a habitual poweruser, I’ve been clamoring for it for years, and it has made my process so much simpler. It’s the equivalent of replacing a screwdriver with a powerdrill.

You no longer need to export your data to slice and dice it to see your desired subsets. Now, you can set a filter while looking at a certain report to get the information you want, without having to exit and create a filter or advanced segment. Within seconds, you can whittle down a massive data table to look at a subset that is important to you.

One example already given in this tutorial video is to show just the keywords that have a low bounce rate (less than 30%) and that referred at least 25 visits. Right away, you’ve found high value and high traffic keywords. We’re using this feature almost every time we look at a data table in a report. It makes you feel much more command over your data.


Here are three more interesting uses of the new Advanced Table Filtering:


Looking for specific non-branded keywords

Sometimes, it helps to see keywords that contain a certain word or phrase, but exclude the brand name. Taking a company called DeLallo Italian Foods, for example. If I wanted to see all the keywords that contain the word Italian food but exclude the brand name DeLallo, I could easily use the advanced filters for this. Previously, I would have done this using regular expressions in the filter:


Filter Keyword: containing ^(?=.*italian food)(?!.*(delallo)).*

No more! Now, we don’t need to do this! Now, it is so easy with the advanced filters. Just filter for Keyword containing Italian food and excluding DeLallo.

And presto! Your report is updated. And, at any time, you can edit this filter to further refine it, or delete it altogether.


Landing Pages, Sorted by Bounce Rate

Has this ever happened to you – you’re looking at your Top Landing Pages report, and you sort by bounce rate, only to have a bunch of pages with 1 entrance clogging the top of the report? With advanced filters, you can filter out those pages with a low number of entrances to get a better look at which landing pages with significant traffic have a high bounce rate. All you have to do is filter by Entrances greater than 50 (or whatever threshhold floats your bounce-rate-boat).

Top Content, Sorted by $ Index


Another similar use for sites with e-commerce or a goal value enabled is when you’re looking at the Top Content report, sorted by $ Index. What you’re trying to find are the pages that have the highest value – those that are viewed during a visit that results in a conversion. Again, it’s common to get a lot of pages at the top that have a low number of pageviews.



 

First, it helps to filter out those pages that have a low number of pageviews. But once you do that, you’ll likely see the pages with the highest $ Index are pages of your shopping cart or checkout process. We can filter out these pages with the advanced filters too – just add a new condition below your first filter that excludes pages that contain the word cart (or checkout, etc.) in the URL.

These three examples give you a taste of Advanced Table Filtering for your analytics, but they just scratch the surface. Once you explore your own analytics, I’m sure you’ll find many more uses of this flexible and powerful new feature. You’ll really notice it’s use when you find you’re happily lingering for 5 extra minutes, using this new interface feature to easily gain insights and ask questions that would’ve taken you an hour before and possibly a data export. Pure wizardry. 🙂

Courtesy: Google Analytics

 

Google Analytics Now Providing Data on YouTube Brand Channels

YouTube, tens of thousands of content partners and advertisers have used brand channels to build communities around their videos. Thanks to our large audience and the creative options available to channel owners — such as the new mosaic feature used by Volkswagen — YouTube brand channels are now a vital part of our platform, attracting millions of video views every day. And, as brand channels have grown in popularity, understanding channel visitors and their behavior has become increasingly important to partners and advertisers fine-tuning their promotional strategies online.

Today we are integrating Google Analytics with YouTube brand channels. This will give partners and advertisers a much richer and deeper understanding of their channel’s performance by fully enabling Google Analytics reporting on their channel as if it were their own site. While all uploaders can still use YouTube Insight to learn detailed information about their video views and user engagement, now advertisers and partners with brand channels can get even more information about their audience. Brand channel owners can track metrics such as how long visitors stay, repeat visits, bounce rate, and page views per visitor. For those who want to tailor their videos to a specific audience, Google Analytics also provides data about where viewers are located geographically and what languages they speak.

YouTube is the world’s largest focus group, and a brand channel with a strong following can provide tremendous insights into the consumers who interact with your content and your brand. We’ve been working hard to open up YouTube and give you more ways to analyze data, and we think this integration will help you further improve your brand channel’s performance and understand your audience. If you own a brand channel, start experimenting with Google Analytics today — you’ll discover many more exciting things that you can do with your data.